1880s | 1890s | 1900s |

1910s

| 1920s | 1930s | 1940s | 1950s | 1960s | 1970s | 1980s | 1990s | 2000s | 2010s

Events include: World War I, 1918 Spanish flu pandemic, sinking of the R.M.S. Titanic, completion of Panama Canal,  Model T Ford introduced, increasing popularity of radio, Hollywood becomes center of the movie industry, advent of jazz music, Prohibition

1910: Women make up 39% of college undergrads and 20% of college faculty in the U.S.

Cottey Presidents:
Virginia Alice Cottey (1884-1922, 1923-1929)


Students circle a May pole during Commencement, c. 1910.4

Commencement, 1914
Commencement, 1914.1

A chafing dish party in Rosemary Hall, c. 1914 Cottey students pose during a chafing dish party in Rosemary Hall, c. 1914.2 The American flags are in honor of World War I.

Cottey campus in 1914
Main Hall and Rosemary Hall in 1914.3

1910

Halley's Comet

Cottey students are allowed to stay up to watch the passing of Halley's Comet, excepting two students who were caught sending notes to boys. These girls and the delivery girls are barred from participating in commencement and all social activities for the rest of the year.

Honor Code Violation

The first violation of the new honor code, instated the previous fall, is committed. Jane Parker helps fellow student Mary Adams cheat on a history exam. As punishment, Mary is given an F in history and Jane is forced to resign as president of the Magnoperians.

Union Depot, c. 1910 Union Depot, c. 1910.

1911

Skirts Discarded for Gym Uniform

Skirts are no longer required for gym. Virginia Alice Cottey Stockard concedes that bloomers will suffice.

Senior Class Banquet

The senior class banquet is held at the Union Depot hotel, not in Cottey's dining hall as in previous years.

1913

Mary Boddie Miss Mary Boddie, c. 1915.

Accreditation

Cottey is accredited by the University of Missouri on the condition that Mary Boddie stop teaching science courses, as her training is deemed insufficient. She teaches Bible study instead.

1914

Co-Ed Party

The Cottey senior class hosts a party to which they invite young men ― as a group, to avoid being too forward. Professor Rose Cottey serves as chaperone.

Main Hall Fire

A fire on the third floor of Main Hall causes minor damage.

1915

Student Commits Suicide

Dec. 20: Cottey student Mary Innis (Myrtle Grace Innis) commits suicide at Radio Springs.

Dr. Blitz Dies

Former Cottey professor Dr. Blitz dies after returning to Nevada for medical treatment. He asks V.A.C. Stockard to bury him at "home" ― Nevada.

1916

Katie Stockard Dies

Aug. 25: Professor Katie Stockard Milam, V.A.C. Stockard's stepdaughter, collapses during a music lesson. She is taken to Stockard Hall, where she dies some time later. Katie asks Alice to care for her three children while they are young.

1917

Rose Cottey Dies

Jan. 15: Professor Rose Cottey faints at her desk in study hall. She dies in hospital the next morning. She had taught at Cottey for 27 years.

Students Perform at Radio Springs

All Cottey students perform A Midsummer Night's Dream at Radio Springs.

Cottey Girls Visit Camp Clark

Camp Clark and Nevada are full of soldiers who cat-call and whistle at Cottey girls. After Alice invites General Clark to dinner at Cottey, he invites the Cottey girls to Camp Clark for an afternoon.

1918

German Courses Removed

Cottey removes German from its curriculum following a motion made by board member and sheet metal entrepreneur, W.F. Norman.

Flu Epidemic

October: Cottey endures a flu epidemic. 145 students are infected within a week. A makeshift hospital is set up in Main Hall's parlors and library. Everyone survives, and a celebration is held in the gym.

Works Cited:
  1. Tinsley, Beverly. "Fifty Years of Progress." The P.E.O. Record Oct. 1977: 4-10. Print.
  2. McVean, Ruby. "Miss Cottey's School: The First 25 Years." The P.E.O. Record. Nov./Dec. 1986: 2-5. Print.
  3. "Sanborn Maps for Missouri." University of Missouri Digital Library. Web.
  4. "Miss Cottey Started Her School in 1884." The P.E.O. Record Mar. 1969: 17-24. Print.
Home | Traditions | Culture | Places | People | Timeline
Blog & Twitter & Facebook

Cotteyphile is proudly carbon-neutral because
climate change threatens biodiversity worldwide.

You may share & adapt original content.

Best viewed in Google Chrome.
Cotteyphile |at| gmail.com.